Korea’s Internet Addicts

author SBS Dateline   2 years ago

Some teens in South Korea are so addicted to gaming, they can no longer distinguish what’s real and what’s not. Dateline follows them as they go through intense month-long digital rehab.

For more on Dean Cornish's story, go to the SBS Dateline website... http://bit.ly/1RKW2Uf

Lost in Manboo was created by 99. Learn more here - https://www.99.media/ A four-square-metre box with a screen and computer. This is what Japanese cyber-cafes offer, around the clock. Most customers just spend an hour or two here. But there are thousands who spend their lives in them.

Loneliness, poverty, chronic illness, losing one's job, the death of a loved one or the breakdown of a marriage - there are many reasons why people fall prey to heartbreak and despair, but most of us, thankfully, will find a route out of that unhappiness or at least develop ways of dealing with it. Even for those who can not, whose sadness turns into the 'black dog' of overwhelming clinical depression, the right help can still make a crucial difference to being able to cope - be it medical care, the understanding of therapists or the love and support of family and friends. Eventually some sort of recovery takes place, some balance and perspective is restored. Yet for some the experience of depression can be so profound that none of this works, that all remedies and assistance seem valueless and there appears to be only one way out - to end it all and takes one's own life. Such a step is, of course, a mark of absolute and final desperation, a tragic, wasteful act that can often be cruelly devastating for the people left behind. But people still do it, many thousands around the world every year; lost souls whose mental health has been damaged and stretched beyond breaking point. Curiously though, some societies and cultures seem more prone to suicide than others. Take South Korea, for example, where suicide has become the fourth most common cause of death, with up to 40 of its citizens taking their own lives every day. For the last eight years it has had the highest suicide rates in the industrialised world (and the second highest in the whole world behind Guyana) and it is now, astonishingly the number one cause of death for its citizens between the ages of 10 and 30. Delve a little deeper into these statistics (gathered as the nation has become more concerned about the phenomenon) and you will find that men commit suicide twice as often as women; that children and young adults will cite the stress of living in a hyper-competitive society or pressure over exam results and college entrance as the main reason for contemplating suicide; that middle-aged South Koreans most often turn to it through concern over personal economic problems; and that the elderly will kill themselves (or consider doing so) because of isolation as a result of the breakdown of the traditional family unit. Each of these facts and figures, so easy to write out, conceals a sad personal story, a life that has somehow lost its purpose and meaning or an unbearable anguish that has been crying out for relief. And they still do not explain why South Koreans are more susceptible to suicide than, let's say, the people of Namibia or Iceland. This film from Veronique Mauduy sets out to investigate that question and to find out what South Korea is doing to bring its most vulnerable people back from the edge. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website http://www.aljazeera.com/

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For the first time, a French director-journalist will join an official trip to the heart of one of the most secret regions in China: Xinjiang. Unstable and by far the most volatile province in the country, it’s a unique opportunity to visit an area that’s normally out of bounds to tourists. Subscribe to wocomoDOCS: https://goo.gl/sBmGkp Located in the far northwest of the People’s Republic, on the borders of central Asia, Xinjiang is the scene of frequent clashes between the Chinese authorities and the Uyghurs, Turkish-speaking Muslims who, like their Tibetan neighbors, reject the colonization of their territory. Going beyond the Uyghur problem (which gets less media coverage than the unrest in neighbouring Tibet) the aim of this documentary is to decipher the propaganda that is currently being put out by the Chinese, who are trying to convince the world, and Chinese tour operators in particular, that the region is a haven of peace, a heaven on earth suitable for mass tourism. Thanks to reliable contacts amongst the organisers of this “Chinese tour” and the help of diasporas based in Europe and Central Asia, and thanks also to accounts given here for the first time by Turkish-speaking Muslims and footage of the most recent revolts, we’ll be able to draw a parallel between a slick, consensual tour and the distress of an entire race. To get a better understanding of the extent to which everything here is built on lies and propaganda, we shall show videos shot by the minorities themselves as well as their accounts. It’s the kind of footage we rarely get to see, showing a reality that China would prefer to keep hidden...

The parents of 13-year old Caitlin Teagart have decided to end her life, saying she can now do nothing but lay on the couch and whine about things being "gay." Subscribe to The Onion on YouTube: http://bit.ly/xzrBUA Like The Onion on Facebook: http://www.fb.com/theonion Follow The Onion on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/theonion

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