Korea’s Internet Addicts

author SBS Dateline   3 years ago

Some teens in South Korea are so addicted to gaming, they can no longer distinguish what’s real and what’s not. Dateline follows them as they go through intense month-long digital rehab.

For more on Dean Cornish's story, go to the SBS Dateline website... http://bit.ly/1RKW2Uf

Gangnam Style Education: South Korea is battling the world's highest teen suicide rates as pressure on Korean students to achieve reaches astronomical levels. I Want A Gangnam Style Face: S. Korea's Bizarre Surgery Trend https://youtu.be/ZCKShGLyeK0 The South Koreans Who Attend Their Own Funerals https://youtu.be/PPTqP-ABJa4 The Heartbreaking Reality Of Korean Family Reunions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SE8HMKiCEVA Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For downloads and more information visit: http://journeyman.tv/68932/short-films/gangnam-style-education-hd.html Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews South Korea is home to a thriving $20 billion private education industry. But 15 hour school days and academic pressure on students are beginning to take its toll, and the authorities are finally taking notice. "You get compared and because everyone does so well I feel pressured to do better. There's a lot of psychological pressure", says one Korean student. Here, making it to the top has become a national obsession. Schools stay open until 11pm, whilst half of teenagers report suicidal thoughts, mostly blaming school pressure. 19-year-old Jae-woo describes the stresses that accompany study for exams: "There's no me... I can't do things I like. When I'm prepping for exams, who I am just gets lost". Feeding off the system are entrepreneurs like Cha Gil-yong, a celebrity teacher who dons wigs and wacky costumes in online lectures. At any one time 300,000 students are logged into his website. "I try to entertain them and keep them from nodding off by wearing these wigs. Students really enjoy it", he says. Now, authorities are finally realising that the price of success may be too great, and are sending out patrols to enforce school closing times. Yet top performing students are even beginning to have plastic surgery in order to improve their job prospects. In a country where failure is not an option, how far will students go for success? ABC Australia – Ref. 6529 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.

China’s live streaming craze is creating a new kind of celebrity and challenging censored media. We go to China to meet these unlikely stars and ask; why are people watching? More​: http://bit.ly/2hhsG9S

Lost in Manboo was created by 99. Learn more here - https://www.99.media/ A four-square-metre box with a screen and computer. This is what Japanese cyber-cafes offer, around the clock. Most customers just spend an hour or two here. But there are thousands who spend their lives in them.

Seoul, South Korea's capital, is at the heart of a growing obsession to look perfect. In the Apgujeong district of Seoul, the streets are lined with endless rows of plastic surgery clinics. Business is booming. In South Korea, v-shaped jaws, double eyelids and dimpled smiles are all the rage and people from across the nation, and the world, are flocking to the clinics for plastic surgery, supporting an industry worth $5bn a year. More than 4,000 clinics provide cosmetic surgery in Seoul, with an estimated 650,000 people a year going under the knife. But the surgeries performed by some of the clinics do not always live up to patients' expectations and the quest for beauty and profits is putting lives at risk. So Yi Yoon has suffered many medical problems since having plastic surgery, including not being able to close one of her eyes. She now works two jobs to pay off her debts and is suffering from depression. On this edition of 101 East, we look at what is driving the growth of this booming business and at what price to individuals and the wider Korean society? 101 East delves into Korea's plastic surgery craze and uncovers the real price of pursuing physical perfection. More from 101 East on: YouTube - http://aje.io/101eastYouTube Facebook - http://facebook.com/101east Twitter - http://twitter.com/aj101east Instagram - http://instagram.com/aj101east Website - http://aljazeera.com/101east

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/dateline Imagine choosing to die when you don’t have a terminal illness. Is it a choice we should have? A powerful Dateline special gets rare access to film the journeys of two people in Belgium – going behind the most liberal euthanasia laws in the world. For more on Brett Mason's story, go to the SBS Dateline website... http://bit.ly/1JSr1sG

319,470 views

2,481 Like   999 Don't like

Comments