Solar Eclipse box. DIY alternative for Solar Eclipse Glasses by Granny B.

author CKToysClub   3 mounths ago

Solar Eclipse box.
DIY alternative for Solar Eclipse Glasses by Granny B.
Tomorrow is a special day.
Millions of Americans will enjoy the Solar Eclipse.
Built you own pinhole projector to enjoy the solar eclipse.
The moon will completely cover the sun, and the corona, can be seen.
Millions of Americans were able to get the safety glasses , made for the eclipse.
You can still make this box to be able to see what the eclipse looks like.
Granny B. shows you how to make this box with simple materials,
You will need a box, paper, tape or glue, a needle, a pair of scissors and a little piece of aluminum foil.
You don't have to decorate the box.
Be safe and don't look at this event without protection for your eyes.
It will really hurt your eyes or it can even blind you.

A total solar eclipse happens somewhere on Earth once every year or two. What is an eclipse? Learn more about how solar eclipses happen, the four types of eclipses, and how to view the sun safely if you're within the path of totality. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Eclipse map adapted with permission: https://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse Solar Eclipse 101 | National Geographic https://youtu.be/cxrLRbkOwKs National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Fox 35 WOFL and a UCF professor shows you how to make your own solar eclipse glasses.

Watching an eclipse? Save your eyeballs -- rig up a sweet viewing set-up with some help from this video. Remember never look directly at the sun without certified sun glasses or a #14 Welder's mask. Instead look at the projected image of the sun on a screen with the help of a few simple house hold objects. Read more about safe eclipse viewing from npr here: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/08/01/540661570/planning-to-watch-the-eclipse-heres-what-you-need-to-protect-your-eyes ↓↓ Links & Info ↓↓ SUBMIT A QUESTION HERE: http://www.npr.org/skunkbear SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dH6fpR TUMBLR: http://skunkbear.tumblr.com/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/NPRskunkbear Credits: Produced by Ryan Kellman and Adam Cole (@cadamole) Senior Editors: Alison Richards and Andrea Kissack Supervising Editor: Anne Gudenkauf Motion Graphic Assistance by CJ Riculan Production Assistant: Shuyao Chen Featured Players: Shuyao Chen, Malaka Gharib, Ryan Kellman, CJ Riculan, Meredith Rizzo, and Ben de la Cruz Music: "I'll Stop When I've Had Enough" - Andrew Peter Kingslow and James King (PRS) "Hugo Bass" - John Hunter Jr and Jonathan Slott (ASCAP), Nichalas Seeley (BMI) SFX from amazing Freesound.org users: zott820 inspectorj timbre salsaaqua mbpim

Let me know if you need help or if you want to collaborate! 😁 *Have a great day*

If you are wondering what I was doing running a butane torch over aluminium in the first place, its simple, I just wanted a blackbody radiator to calibrate my new spectrometer. It failed.... but it did reveal some rather interesting behavior!

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